DIN & Sakuro

Angus Carter

I have always been fascinated with the unseen and overlooked material that makes up our existence. The forest floor, sidewalks, yards, and indeed the earth floor itself are all comprised of almost microscopic particles of decomposing matter in the form of what we commonly call dirt. Our world is literally built upon this organic breakdown and with it our world shifts with every moment as the “dirt” itself evolves, decomposes and alters our more physical realities. The wind throws dirt and sand blasts a wall, weathering buildings; matter decomposes bringing forth new life; foundations deteriorate, crumbling mountains and rerouting rivers; and our bodies are aged the same way, in turn shredding skin and adding to the cycle.

In my work I play with the same forces, allowing dirt to alter the film and at times construct it. I embrace this degradation and relish in it. I allow the dirt to alter/create the work and in turn the work constantly shifts with the dirt, altering its reality and our conception of a larger reality.

Rejecting "traditional" notions that film should be narrative, linear, concrete or plot driven I strive to make films focusing on the abstract and ephemeral nature of film, focusing on breaking down and redefining notions of what film is and can be.


DIN

A "film without film", the entire piece was constructed without the use of a camera or film. Instead "DIN" was constructed  with the use of packing tape and organic material ie: dirt;  such as leaves, dirt, spider webs, etc. Shown on a handmade, hand cranked projector "DIN" is meant to be a reflection on the decaying and ephemeral environment around us. As such, the film itself is constantly shifting as the natural elements it is composed of decompose and thus reshape the finished product with each screening.

DIN



Sakuro

A modern cave painting focused on a woman dancing as the film’s degradation overwhelms her.

Sakuro



Angus Carter is a painter, photographer and filmmaker from the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia. His work often focuses on primitive modes of existence and shifting modes of reality. Angus’ films have shown at numerous festivals around the world and his painting have exhibited in numerous galleries and private collections across the globe.